Hypermobility Joint Syndrome

Joint hypermobility means that some or all of a person’s joints have an unusually large range of movement. People with hypermobility are particularly supple and able to move their limbs into positions others find impossible. Joint hypermobility is what some people refer to as having “loose joints” or being “double-jointed”.

JOINT HYPERMOBILITY SYNDROME

Many people with hypermobile joints don’t have any problems, and some people – such as ballet dancers, gymnasts and musicians – may actually benefit from the increased flexibility.

However, some people with joint hypermobility can have a number of unpleasant symptoms as well, such as:

If hypermobility occurs alongside symptoms such as these, it is known as joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS).

Read more about the symptoms of joint hypermobility and diagnosing joint hypermobility.

LIVING WITH JOINT HYPERMOBILITY

Most people with hypermobile joints won’t experience any problems and won’t require any medical treatment or support.

However, JHS can be very difficult to live with because it can cause such a wide range of symptoms.

People with JHS often benefit from a combination of controlled exercise and physiotherapy, as well as additional help to manage pain and make everyday tasks easier.

The nature of JHS means that you are at increased risk of injuries, such as dislocations and sprains. Managing the condition may therefore also involve treating short-term injuries as they arise, while following a long-term treatment plan to manage daily symptoms.

Read more about treating joint hypermobility.

WHO IS AFFECTED

Joint hypermobility is thought to be very common, particularly in children and young people. Some estimates suggest that around one in every five people in the UK may have hypermobile joints.

In many cases, the joints become stiffer with age, although joint hypermobility and its associated symptoms can continue into adult life.

It’s not known how many people have JHS in the UK, as the condition is often not recognised or is misdiagnosed. It’s thought to be more common in females than males, and less common in white people than those of other ethnic backgrounds.

People with joint hypermobility have an unusually large range of movement in some or all of their joints

Contact Numbers

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Tel: 07813 596505 Or 01482 870577

Will offer support and advice on how to deal with anxiety and utilising Cognitive Behaviour Therapy to overcome any problems or difficulties you may have.

Email: tonydavis@tonydavis.karoo.co.uk